Student-Athletes Accused of Title IX in Oklahoma

Most colleges and universities in the state of Oklahoma adhere to a federal law known as Title IX. Its primary function since its enactment in 1972 has been to resolve gender-related discrimination issues in higher education. But throughout the years, Title IX has been applied in a wide span of cases - to fix the disparity in opportunities for intercollegiate women athletes to the establishment of rights for pregnant women on campus. But recently, the law is addressed due to a much more pervasive issue: sexual misconduct. 

When you're accused of sexual misconduct or named as a “respondent” in a Title IX case, you're already in for an uphill battle throughout the process. Yet another level of complexity is added into the process when you are a student-athlete. Allegations will not be taken lightly, and the stigma that accompanies the role of a respondent party will single-handedly turn your college and athletic experience upside down. To successfully navigate the Title IX process as a student-athlete and achieve due process, you absolutely need the help of an attorney-advisor. Here's why:

You Might Not Be Eligible to Play

After you've been accused of sexual misconduct, your school will conduct a fact-finding investigation. Throughout the course of this investigation, a series of interim measures may be imposed until a determination is made. Among the most detrimental interim measures for student-athletes is suspension from the team. 

In the absence of specific uniform protocol and guidelines regarding who imposes interim measures, outside parties like athletic directors and coaches have the liberty to make decisions that will affect your athletic career. In a perfect world, you'd trust that these decision