Student-Athletes Accused of Title IX in New Jersey

Being accused - or formally known as a respondent - in a Title IX complaint alleging sexual misconduct is an uphill battle within itself. There's an unshakeable stigma that comes with this label that often warrants premature mistreatment and judgment far before due process is carried out. Being a student-athlete who happens to also be a respondent adds another layer of complexity to a whirlwind of a process. To successfully navigate the Title IX process as a student-athlete respondent, you absolutely need the help of an attorney-advisor. Here's why:

The Odds Are Against You

According to an analysis of ESPN television program, "Outside the Lines," college athletes are three times more likely than other students to be accused of sexual misconduct at Power 5 conference schools. Yes, you read that right. You are three times more likely to be accused of sexual misconduct than the average student.

The data provided that about 6.3 percent of Title IX complaints against students - whether the complaint resulted in a formal investigation or not - involved an athlete as the person accused of wrongdoing. Whether or not the student-athletes were found “responsible” for these accusations were not included in the study. 

The findings of this analysis may not be all too surprising given the countless number of high-profile cases of sexual misconduct that have surfaced involving very prominent student-athletes. Nonetheless, this information should compel you to ensure that the adjudication process is a